Fractures and Orthopaedic Injuries

break

Orthopaedic injuries involve any injury to the musculoskeletal system, meaning injuries to bones, joints, ligaments, cartilage, tendons and muscles that support the bones. Bone fractures, a common orthopaedic injury, are often sustained in motor vehicle accidents, falls or other personal mishaps. If your injury is a result of another person’s negligence or wrongful act, such as negligent driving, you may have a claim for compensation.

Serious fractures or broken bones can take a long time to heal. “Displaced” fractures can injury the tissues and nerves surrounding the fractured bone. Sometimes fractures are fixed by surgical insertion of “hardware” such as plates, screws and nails, which can cause further pain, swelling of tissues, and irritation. In some cases, further surgery will be required months or years following the initial fracture, to remove the hardware, resulting in a further period of recovery and rehabilitation.

If fractures occur at the location of a joint, typically a hip, ankle, foot, or knee, complications are common. Such complications might include arthritis, chronic pain, swelling and reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). When fractures involve the bones of the hips, legs, feet or ankles, a person may be wheelchair bound for up to three months or more following injury.

After traumatic injury to the complex musculoskeletal system, our bodies require timely diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. MacIsaac & Company’s lawyers understand through experience that orthopaedic injuries and fractures can cause pain and disability for years, and in some cases, for life. In the course of representing injured clients, we retain appropriate medical experts to accurately diagnose your injuries and any complications you have suffered, or are likely to suffer, and provide a prognosis so that you receive compensation for past and future losses for the full extent of your injury.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn